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African Animation on the Rise: Nearly a Third of Co-Production Pitch Projects at MIA Come From Africa, Disney’s ‘Kizazi Moto’ in Spotlight

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Introduced last year, MIA’s dedicated animation program heads into its sophomore edition with a more firmly entrenched industry position and a resoundingly global outlook. With the program scaffolding already in place, MIA curators spent the past year shoring up support and scouting for projects at key markets in Berlin, Cannes and Annecy, resulting in a program of roughly 30 co-production pitch projects and works-on-progress that altogether spans more than 40 countries.

The rise in animation studios across the African continent will be a major theme of this year’s edition, with nearly one third of the co-production pitch projects coming from Africa-based studios. Among them, titles like Ama Adi-Dako’s “Drumland,” Jérémie Becquer and Julien Becquer’s “Mia Moké,” Esmail Zalat’s “The Prey” and Kay Carmichael’s “Troll Girl” will bring studios based in Ghana, Senegal, Cameroon, Egypt and South Africa into the fold.

Meanwhile, on the conference side, an Oct. 10 panel called “Africa Roars!” will reflect this industry growth with a spotlight on the Disney+ African futurist anthology series “Kizazi Moto: Generation Fire,” and the work of animation studios from across the continent. Triggerfish CEO Stuart Forrest will share the stage with The Hidden Hand co-founder Lesego Vorster, Creatures Animation Studio CEO Raymond Malinga and moderator Mounia Aram for a panel that stretches across South Africa, Uganda and Morocco.

Mexican co-production pitch project “The Last Wave,” from directors Douglas Enrique Gomez Mendiburu and Joe Alanís, and Mexican-Canadian animation showcase title “My Brother the Monster,” from Gasolino and Arcana Studios, will both offer a glimpse of North American might from outside the U.S., while roughly half the selected projects are already international co-productions. The Spanish-Indian “Miniraja,” produced by Maria Bonaria Fois, is one such unconventional pairing.

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By way of industry trends, program curators have seen (what was once industry standard) polished 3D give way to 2D textures at once messier, flatter, and closer to the inked lines of the page – in keeping with the aesthetic overhaul kicked off by 2018’s “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse” and furthered by this summer’s “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Mutant Mayhem,” among others.

Conference planners will also stress animation’s interdisciplinary bona fides. Though “Waltz with Bashir” director Ari Folman will not be able to travel for a scheduled talk about animated non-fiction, on-site attendees will consider what role advanced language models like ChatGPT might play in the future of the medium with a new-media focused panel.

Source: variety.com

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Junior Pope: Ini Edo mourns, calls for reforms in Nollywood

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Nollywood actress Ini Edo has responded to the tragic death of her colleague, Junior Pope Odonwodo, famously known as Junior Pope, who lost his life in a river while filming a movie.

Expressing her anger, Ini criticized the inadequate structure of the industry, which she believes was responsible for to such tragedies.

She mourned the loss of the actor and emphasized that his death should serve as a wake-up call for the implementation of proper regulations and structures to ensure safety during productions.

Ini trolled her colleague, Adanma Luke, who produced movie, urging those who are not qualified for such roles to refrain from undertaking them due to the negligence that can result.

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The actress, who is also a mother, described Junior Pope’s death as a sacrifice that should prompt significant changes within the industry.

She stressed the need for a comprehensive overhaul of the system, with the implementation of practical rules and regulations to address emergencies and safeguard everyone involved.

Reflecting on the untimely loss of Junior Pope, she lamented the departure of the “good ones” and expressed deep sorrow over his death.

“Jnr Pope did not have to sacrifice his life for nollywood to realize the need for a long and much needed regulatory structure that would safeguard an entire production . Yes .. every one is a producer now and all are guilty of negligence of some sort.. and this has to stop. This is one sacrifice too many and must count for something … The system has to undergo a total overhaul with practical rules and regulations that caters to everyone in cases of emergencies…. I will never understand why the good ones go so soon‍♀️

Rest on brother … This one cuts really deep.”

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My rise to stardom was not “overnight success” – Asake

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Afrobeats star Ahmed Ololade, popularly known as Asake, has said that it is difficult to get a job in Nigeria with tattoos.

The artist, who has a neck tattoo, said he couldn’t work for any company or do business because of the stereotypes about tattoos in Nigeria.

Asake, who featured in the latest issue of GQ magazine, said: “In Nigeria, if you have a tattoo on your neck, you can’t work anywhere. I can’t work for any company. I can’t sell anything.”

He also spoke about his “sudden stardom,” stressing that his rise in the music industry was not an “overnight success” as it seems.

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“You have to understand: I got there in two years, but I’ve been working for years. People are counting the days you’re successful. They don’t count the days you’ve been working towards it. Nobody gives a fvck about that,” Asake said.

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Why I couldn’t continue with Jonzing World – Ruger on fallout with D’Prince’s label

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Nigerian Dancehall sensation Michael Adebayo Olayinka popularly known as Ruger, has revealed why he parted ways with Jonzing World, a label owned by D’Prince.

Ruger, said he appreciates that his former record label brought him to the limelight, but he could not renew his contract because the label did not push his brand as much as he wanted to be pushed.

He accused his former record label boss, D’Prince, of abandoning him and using his music earnings to hunt for new talents.

Ranting in a series of posts on X on Thursday, Ruger said he has more to say but scared that he might get stabbed if he divulged more about the record label.

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He wrote, “As much as I’m very appreciative of the fact that Jonzing world introduced me to the world, I just couldn’t continue with them because they got too comfortable with the money they were making from me and couldn’t push me further as I wanted to be pushed. Was supposed to renegotiate the contract but I couldn’t imagine 5 years more without action.

As much as I’m very appreciative of the fact that Jonzing world introduced me to the world, I just couldn’t continue with them because they got too comfortable with the money they were making from me and couldn’t push me further as I wanted to be pushed. Was supposed to…

“Dey use my money Dey fund new artist, leaving me in the dark, not being transparent. I just laugh. How e be now?

I complained, I got angry, some people tell me say no be so dem Dey do things. I still go back HQ go collect fake hugs and handshakes. Nothing still change. I wan mad

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